The Women Pilots Room

NEWLY RENOVATED MAY 2013

Just six percent of all pilots are women -- and that's in the 21st century. Prior to World War I, women pilots were even scarcer. These intrepid women -- pioneers, all -- were trail blazers that paved the way for future stars like Amelia Earhart, Jackie Cochran, and scores of others.

In February 2005, I spent weeks digging through archives, reading books, and searching the internet, in search of images of these early pioneer female pilots. We now share them with you in this room -- a small but lasting tribute to them all.

Ultimately I gathered images of 39 pioneer women pilots, from 1909 to 1984. During that time their experiences tracked precisely the developing history of flight. The earliest woman, Madame de Laroche, flew in 1909 at a speed of 75 miles per hours. The second to last woman, Jackie Cochran, still holds the woman's absolute speed record, flying 1,429 miles per hour in an F-104 fighter.

And, of course, Sally Ride flew in the Space Shuttle at 17,000 miles per hour!  

Today, their torch is still carried by the Ninety-Nines, the organization of womens pilots.  Established in 1929 by 99 women pilots, the members of The Ninety-Nines, Inc., International Organization of Women Pilots, are represented in all areas of aviation. And, to quote Amelia Earhart, one of the founders: they still fly “for the fun of it!” 

Decorated to reflect their love flight, this no-pet room boasts every amenity, including a refrigerator, microwave, coffee maker, 32" flat-screen HDTV, DVD player, hair dryer, and a queen bed.  Artwork and memorabilia from women pilots throughout history hang from every wall -- and you'll enjoy our signature "delivered-to-your-room" continental breakfast during your stay!